Female-Only Buildings in the Early 20th Century

As a part of Women’s History month, Landmark West will be partaking in a special program at the New York Historical Society. Historian Nina Harkrader will lead a discussion of NYC buildings which were designated for single women only.

All the Single Ladies: “Women Only” Buildings in Early 20th Century New York City

During the early 1900s, single women bravely created new paths and broke free from more traditional household roles. Women lived and worked in major cities in a variety of careers, including shop girls, dress-makers, stenographers, nurses, and even journalists.

The life of a single woman working in the city was difficult, as women faced limited housing options. The choices which were available to them were unsafe or unaffordable, and hotels did not allow single women to stay.

Due to these challenges, women-only residence buildings grew in popularity as they provided single working women with safe living arrangements. These housing arrangements contributed to a growth in women’s independence between the late 1800’s and early 1900’s.

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Event details:

  • Wednesday, March 13th from 5:30-7:00pm.
  • The Center For Women’s History at The New York Historical Society
  • 170 Central Park West (at 77th Street)

Tickets are $10 for the general public and $5 for LW members (members can use the discount code 0313). Or for assistance, give them a call at (212) 496-8110. Refreshments will be served as well.

Get Tickets Here
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Hannah Rosenfield

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Hannah Rosenfield is an avid writer and new resident of the Upper West Side. She graduated from Binghamton University in May of 2018, after studying Creative Writing and works in advertising. In her free time, Hannah loves reading the New York Times food section, petting all the dogs on the Upper West Side, and strolling through Central Park.

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